Weekend 5 Case Presentation

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This topic contains 11 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by  Katie Long 3 days, 20 hours ago.

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  • #5963

    Katie Long
    Participant

    Hey all, please see the attached document for next weekend.

    1. Given this information, what is your primary hypothesis? What differential diagnoses do you have?
    2. Is there a potential psychosocial factor involved in the fact that he has a family history or testicular CA despite the fact that his testing is negative?
    3. What (if any) referrals would you consider for this patient? Are there any factors that you find concerning? Is this patient appropriate for OP ortho PT care?
    4. I have never seen a patient presenting like this as a new therapist. I often have trouble having confidence in myself and exuding confidence to my patients when I am unfamiliar with a patient’s presentation. How do you approach patient education, prognosis and patient buy-in with a patient when their case is unfamiliar to you?
    5. What HEP would you send this patient home with on day 1?

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  • #5988

    Tyler France
    Participant

    Hey Katie,

    Definitely an interesting case. Have other medical providers ruled out a hernia as a cause of his symptoms? Considering many of his aggs include increased intra-abdominal pressure, that would be my first thought. If that has been ruled out and we are looking at a strictly MSK cause of the pain, I would have to lean towards SIJ dysfunction due to the 4 positive findings from the test cluster, though it seems curious with no mechanism. Did this pain begin insidiously or was there a mechanism to it? Have you asked him if he is worried that his pain may be coming from cancer? I would say that his answer to that question could determine whether that may be a factor in his treatment. Has he seen a urologist? I would be most concerned about the testicular pain when emptying a full bladder in the morning.

    • This reply was modified 2 weeks, 1 day ago by  Tyler France.
  • #5990

    Justin Pretlow
    Participant

    Hi Katie,

    1. Nature of Sx seems consistent with athletic pubalgia(despite not being a high level athlete, or was he?). Diff Dx: Si joint dysfunction, pudendal nerve entrapment, pubic symphysis dysfunction, FAI, iliopsoas tendinopathy.
    2. I think the family history of CA and chronic nature of symptoms could contribute to hyper awareness concerning his pain.
    3. Aggravation of symptoms with emptying a full bladder is concerning. I assume he’s seen a urologist? Is he being followed by other Dr.’s besides his primary care? He sounds appropriate for PT but I would want to make sure he has been completely worked up by his referring physician. Any imaging?
    4. If I’m unfamiliar with a patient’s presentation, I try to make sure I explain well what I think is going on and make sure the patient understands the plan and what the next step will be if that plan does not work.
    5. This one’s hard to answer. I would probably address a movement pattern that he has to do for work (eg squatting) and try out a couple of exercises that may improve that movement pattern or decrease symptoms with that movement pattern.

  • #5991

    Katie Long
    Participant

    Hi guys, thanks for the discussion! He has had a CT scan and been seen by a urologist and has had GI/GU/Hernia and CA all ruled out in addition to the mentioned sonogram. He said his family history of CA caused him to seek care in the first place, but he stated that he felt better knowing that it was ruled out. There was no mechanism and he is/was not an athlete of any kind.

  • #5992

    Jennifer Boyle
    Participant

    Hey Katie! Thanks for your case for this weekend. It is definitely a presentation I have not seen either. Did you use any special questions to further r/o the other more serious things other than cancer? I think that his family history can have an impact in his psychosocial presentation but this is a great place for you to step in and show him how mechanical some of his symptoms are presenting. Hopefully showing him that movements can provoke his pains can help put his mind at ease and at the same time help use pt education to build his confidence in you to treat him. Its great that he is feeling better knowing that CA has been ruled out and will also help with pt buy-in. You mentioned him seeing a urologist, has this presented with any new findings that may help understand why he is having pain emptying his bladder?

  • #6002

    Eric Magrum
    Moderator

    Please think neural entrapment in the region.
    Various nerves – illioinginual, obturator, femoral, pudendal, genitofemoral.

    How would you asses these specific nerves?
    Would you refer, and to who?

  • #6003

    Sarah Bosserman
    Participant

    Hi Katie! interesting case. Pudendal or obturator nerves came to mind with pain patterns and symptoms (pudendal worsens with sitting and obturator with hip abduction and extension). Thinking about differentials of SIJ, FAI, iliopsoas/adductor tendinopathy. Did you find any significant muscle weakness? 2 years is a long time, has the pain been intermittent with more recent exacerbation or consistent and did the groin or LBP come first (or at the same time)? Was just curious about the quality of his motion if he has had pain for that long, seems like he has some significant hypomobility in lumbar spine and hip and how they may affect how he bends and lifts.

  • #6004

    Eric Magrum
    Moderator

    Should be on your differential.

    Good recent review here.

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  • #6009

    Katie Long
    Participant

    Yes, I definitely should have had peripheral nerve entrapment on my differential list. Unfortunately, Eric posted this article on our discussion board two days after I evaluated him! I had not really even considered some of those peripheral nerve entrapments until that article, but need to be better about including them on my differential list.

  • #6010

    Katie Long
    Participant

    Hey all, here are those articles I used! Hope they help!

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  • #6018

    Scott Resetar
    Participant

    Hi everyone,
    I showed this thread to our Women’s Health Specialist, and here was her reply.

    “It does seem like maybe some of his (+) findings for LBP and SIJ may be secondary, compensatory patterns for PFMD. Neuralgia is certainly a good thought, except nerve pain tends to not ease quickly. Sounds to me like classic male pelvic floor muscle dysfunction likely picking up a little pudendal nerve either at levator ani or obturator internus. I’d be curious to know about hamstring tension, SLR findings and fascial restrictions. Pudendal neuralgia is often provoked with hip flexion past 90 with or without ER. I wonder if he gets any rectal pain or ever feels fullness like he is sitting on a ball. Fasical assessment? Hyper- or hypomobility testing throughout? Again, many findings to me scream PFM overactivity, I’d refer this guy to a pelvic floor PT for further assessment and consider co-treating! ”

    Hope that helps!

  • #6020

    Katie Long
    Participant

    Hi Scott, these are all some good points, however he ended up only coming in for a couple of sessions before he hurt his shoulder and decided to seek care from an orthopedic surgeon for that and put this on hold. I contacted two pelvic floor PTs and they gave me some tips while I was seeing him so I had some help from them too! Thanks for the input!

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